Pedagogy of the Plants

Posts Tagged ‘praying mantis

Okra Leaf Squatter

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Young Praying Mantis on Okra Leaf 2

 

While watering the garden, this little neighbor crawls out from under an okra leaf.

 

Young Praying Mantis on Okra Leaf

Written by Cameron Brooks

June 24, 2013 at 12:52 pm

Two Wheeled Mantis, by Eko Suparman

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praying-mantis-bike-800x499

Eko Suparman took this beautiful photo in a Muslim cemetery in Borneo. The shot is featured on the cover of the May/June issue of Orion MagazineClick here to read an interview with the photographer, or here to see photos of local Mandidae neighbors who have visited our small garden here in Athens.

Written by Cameron Brooks

June 21, 2013 at 3:34 pm

New (Mantidae) Neighbors

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Introduction to the mantid neighbors is the same as last year’s. More…

Written by Cameron Brooks

July 17, 2011 at 2:05 pm

Devil’s Backbone, Pedilanthus tithymaloides

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Written by Cameron Brooks

May 23, 2010 at 10:15 pm

Arugula, Eruca sativa

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This year’s end of the year party was held in the art teacher’s garden.  During a tour I noticed that her arugula was flowering like mine.  She said it’s called “bolting” when greens begin forming flowerets.  After that, they produce significantly fewer leaves.  I’ll eat the flowers before seeding begins.

This afternoon, my neighbor caught me carrying a couple plants I’d sprouted from a pumpkin we carved in class last October.  The middle school math teacher-turned chef-turned college professor-turned retired gardener and world traveler, offered greens from his garden, then gave me a tour and advice for growing greens, fruit trees, tomatoes, herbs, and potatoes.

While watering the garden, a young praying mantis headed for higher ground along the edge of the raised bed against the side of the house.  A large spider took notice and peered down at a rival killer.

I turned for a moment to water the tomatoes, and when I looked back the mantis and spider were gone.

Click the link below for a vegan arugula recipe by Isa Chandra Moskowitz:

Chickpea Picatta

 

 

Ghost Plant, Graptopetalum paraguayense

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These are the only ghost plant flowers I’ve ever seen.  The plant sits next to a sunny window in the lobby/reception room of the Elqui Domos, in Elqui Valley, Chile.

This planter brings to mind a quote I scribbled in a journal years ago:

The belief that violence is a reasonable and often necessary route to achieving our aims goes unquestioned in most societies. Violence is thought to be the nature of things. It’s what works. It seems inevitable-the last and often, the first resort in conflicts. This Myth of Redemptive Violence is the real myth of the modern world. It, and not Judaism or Christianity or Islam, is the dominant religion in our society.

by Walter Wink

The Myth of Redemptive Violence is a Babylonian creation story.  The “Enuma Elish” (circa 1250 BCE), is a story about two parent gods who give birth to all other gods. The children kill the father because they discover their parents’ plans to kill them all because they make too much noise. Enraged, the battle ensues between the gods and their mother. The youngest of the gods winds-up killing her.

One July, I bought this plant from a woman at a flea market outside of town my students call “La Pulga.”  The specter floated above the stoop in a hanging basket for about a year. Once I swung the door too wide, and knocked it seven feet to the ground.  After a considerable soil hemorrhage left a small hollow under the plant, I noticed an illusive wren flitting back and forth with twigs and other oddments.  The plant thrived while baby birds hatched beneath.

I met a curious mantis climbing the funbox at a local skate spot after a nose manual, then found this little guy on the porch when I got home.

Buenos dias.