Pedagogy of the Plants

Archive for the ‘Georgia Mountains’ Category

Ephemeral Ghost Pipe

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Monotropa uniflora

The illusive rows of ghostly flowers are actually a fungus feeding on fungi that’s feeding on tree roots. They’re epiparasites, or parasites sourcing nutrients from other parasites.

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Monotropa unifloraHiawa

Eastern Native American tribes once used ghost pipe as an anticonvulsive and painkiller.

Written by Cameron Brooks

June 27, 2020 at 11:00 am

Barometer Earthstar

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Astraeus hygrometricus

In the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest, a chance encounter with this earthstar over a year ago required balance. Literally.

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Astraeus hygrometricus

The High Shoals Creek Falls Trail was closed, but a fallen tree offered intrepid hikers views of the waterfall. A mud-caked log was the only route across the creek after a tree chopped the footbridge in half.

The curious alien spore sac rested on a rock next to the platform/overlook.

Hanging Out Above Tallulah Gorge

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On days devoted to whitewater boating, 500-700 cubic feet of water flows through the Tallulah Gorge every second. A cool mist rises to meet hikers from around the world swaying in awe 80 feet above on a suspension bridge.

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The eastern tiger swallowtail clings to a red maple limb.

Written by Cameron Brooks

April 23, 2018 at 6:59 pm

American Trout Lily, Erythronium americanum

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Hikers flock to Raven Cliff Falls Trail for the rush of falling water, but a trip in early April offers subtler beauty along the way.

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Since ninety-nine percent of trout lily plants are non-flowering, the illusive perennials pictured above are one-percenters thriving in the mountains of White County.

Mountain Laurel, Kalmia latifolia

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Mountain Laurel 1

 

Mountain Laurel 2

 

Mountain Laurel 3

 

Written by Cameron Brooks

July 20, 2014 at 11:45 am

Blood Mountain Vista

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Blood Mountain

 

Written by Cameron Brooks

July 20, 2014 at 11:33 am

Chimney Rock State Park

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Chimney Rock Sate Park Vista

 

Diablo

 

Chimney Rock Waterfall

 

Chimney Rock State Park Vista 2

 

Written by Cameron Brooks

July 20, 2014 at 11:06 am

Morning Light

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Morning Light

Written by Cameron Brooks

July 30, 2013 at 12:44 pm

Black Rock Mountain Pkwy Shack

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Black Rock Mountain Pkwy Shack

 

Black Rock Mountain Pkwy Shack

Written by Cameron Brooks

July 30, 2013 at 12:43 pm

Black Rock Mountain Pine

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Black Rock Mountain Pine

 

This young conifer lives around 3,640 feet above sea level, atop the oldest mountain range in North America.

Written by Cameron Brooks

July 30, 2013 at 10:16 am

Blue Ridge Overlook Vistas

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Blue Ridge Overlook Vista

 

Blue Ridge Overlook Sunset

 

For a panoramic view with each mountain and knob labeled, click here.

Written by Cameron Brooks

July 30, 2013 at 10:06 am

Black Rock Mountain Moss

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James E Edmonds Trail Moss

 

Written by Cameron Brooks

July 27, 2013 at 5:30 pm

Mindful of the Falls

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Fall Branch Falls Stone Stack

 

Fall Branch Falls Stone Art

 

Fall Branch Falls Natural Art

Written by Cameron Brooks

July 14, 2013 at 9:44 am

Coral Fungus and Friends

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Coral Fungus

North Georgia Chanterelles

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Discolored Chanterelle

Unidentified Seed Case

Chanterelle

Chanterelles

Click here for Isa Chandra Moskowitz’s vegan white wine garlic chanterelle recipe (which I’ll try after verifying they’re actually chanterelles).

Written by Cameron Brooks

July 10, 2013 at 6:29 pm

“Deer trail becomes Indian trail becomes county road becomes interstate.”

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General Orders No. 9 is a title as peculiar as the smoking rabbit staring back from the top shelf of new releases at Vision Video.  The lone copy has neither synopsis, nor cast list.  One of three young clerks says he’s seen it, and recommends watching under the influence of cough syrup.  Below the kid’s ironic Dali ‘stache comes a vague description, “…really, really, really long shots of a river, and some kind of an environmental message.”  He doesn’t have to say another word.

In a 2011 interview with Filmmaker Magazine, Robert Pearsons succinctly describes the award-winning General Orders No. 9 as “a balance of visuals, voice and music.”  The Middle Georgia native never went to film school, and his haunting debut was 11 years in the making.

According to the film’s website, it’s “an experimental documentary that contemplates the signs of loss and change in the American South as potent metaphors of personal and collective destiny.”

Metaphysical cartography inspired by mappae mundi mixes with juxtaposed shots of urban blight and bucolic rural landscapes, inciting difficult questions, while roads and highways sweep over land like a cancer.

Pearson’s influences include, among others, the writings of William Bartram, and storied film directors Herzog, Tarkovsky, and David Lynch.  William Davidson’s soft-spoken narration in a deep drawl morphs from historical accounts of early colonization over animated county maps, to trance-like ruminations on human dominion over the natural world.  View the official trailer here.

Mindful of the Ocoee

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Around 3:30, the Ocoee recedes over the course of a couple hours as the Tennessee Valley Authority’s dam no. 3 diverts millions of gallons of water from a four mile stretch engineered in 1996 for “the world’s first Olympic whitewater event on a natural river” (USDA Forest Service).  This isn’t what they had in mind.

Mountain Laurel Bud

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Written by Cameron Brooks

December 27, 2011 at 1:53 pm

Mountain Moss

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Mustard colored oak leaves offer an Andy Goldsworthy moment.

Written by Cameron Brooks

December 27, 2011 at 1:15 pm

Sandra’s Spears

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Sandra gave me a jar of pickles from her North Georgia garden back in July, and said they’d be ready to eat September first.  It was tough holding off while they sat steeped in dill on the counter, and now they’re almost gone after four days of September.  Click here for more from the mountains.

Written by Cameron Brooks

September 4, 2011 at 1:19 pm